Fiction

Movier & Stillier

The story “Movier & Stillier” looks at how, as adults, we accept the use of misleading language as normative and how, when our perceptions are challenged, indeed, even when our perceptions are bested, we revert to what we know. It also bespeaks the use of language for control: in the story, a young girl decides to use more honest language, and is teased for it, thereby causing her to abandon her principled stance on word use. In short, this is a story about human habit, and how words are used to enforce that habit.

Only Fools Can Be Truly Happy

How is the self conceptualized when viewed from someone else’s perspective? This foreign perspective brews doubt and confusion within the subject’s mind. It results in a gradual decline of confidence which, in turn, leads to complacency or inaction. “Only Fools Can Be Truly Happy” draws on this confusion of self-perception and attempts to bring forth the complexity and unpredictability of human behavior.

Drowned Dreams

We will all eventually die, and although that seems an unhappy fate, fiction, fantasy, and celebrations can help us cope with that inevitable end. “Drowned Dreams” is about abuse, fear, and death. Halloween is a celebration where such topics are permissible in circles they would normally not be spoken of, creating an environment where necessary topics are briefly considered non-taboo. My story is in part a reminder that all time is borrowed time, and we will all eventually give our bodies back to the earth it came from, decay being a form of freedom and rebirth.

The Winning Way

“The Winning Way” examines the slow, insidious chipping away of one’s own conscience through adherence to rigid belief systems, which provide a comforting certainty. It takes a hard look at what humans are willing to give up to feel connected, and how easy it is for us to fall prey to sinister ideas and beliefs when we are hungry, nearly starving with unmet needs. This story taps into a drama currently playing out in the world, as COVID-19 runs rampant, along with conspiracies. Many families are watching as vulnerable loved ones cleave to groups such as QAnon. They ask themselves, “How can they believe these things?” This story is a response to that question.

The Rabbit Hutch

In the 1950s, Harry Harlow performed a controversial psychological experiment in which he separated baby monkeys from their mothers and placed them in isolation for months. The effects included: mental distress, depression, aggression towards self and others, and obliteration of social instincts. Animal rights supporters’ outrage led to the criticism of solitary confinement for humans in prison — if the effects were this debilitating for monkeys trapped in a cage, how then can humans cope with the same conditions? On a larger scale, the past year (2020) has introduced large swaths of Earth’s population to governmental lockdowns due to COVID-19. Though much of the world has since reopened, we have been faced with the reality of isolation and its trade-offs when it comes to contracting COVID-19. “The Rabbit Hutch” grapples with the effects of social isolation and the desire for freedom despite what might be waiting for the narrator outside of lockdown.

The Perpetual Metronome

The following fiction piece explores historical events such as the Cold War, which in many ways still influence domestic and foreign policy in the U.S. It also touches on the current stance the government is taking in relation to the UFO phenomenon, concepts of ‘misinformation,’ American cultural history (principles relating to the constitution and blind patriotism), and the general surrealness of living in the U.S. In “The Perpetual Metronome,” the author attempts to tie these themes together in a way that can be enjoyed as a surreal story laced with the drowsy nostalgia of Rust-belt, upstate New York — or really, anywhere U.S. — and full of historical references and existential dread.

The Midnight Boys

It can be easy in today’s world — when many people’s horizons have shrunk to their living rooms, or at most a necessary outing to the darkened streets — to forget that small, seemingly insignificant acts can have both personal and political significance. This also holds true for animals. ‘The Midnight Boys’ attempts to dig under the surface of one household’s experience for the ruff truth of the human condition.

The End of Money

What would happen to humanity and human behavior if our societies no longer relied on monetary value at all? Could we return to a barter system? Or, is currency and its use so ingrained in the human condition that all societal achievement and advancement would cease without it? Who are we without a system that encourages and demands production?