visual art

The Human Body: Diversity in Unity

Are we more than the bodies we exist within? How do our bodies impact the experiences we have and what kinds of tolls do our experiences have on our bodies? As humans, we are bound by physicality—but, are we? Makeup, plastic surgery, donor transplants, gender reassignment surgeries, etc. have already altered our relationship with our physical bodies—but what about AI and its future impact on the body? Will we be able to transcend beyond our corporeal limitations one day? There is ethereal light shining for those with eyes to see our corporeal reality.

Asphodel

These watercolors aim to capture the prevalence of death and decay in our daily lives, but also show how even now, we blend it into the background, not wanting to look. Halloween and fantasy help us come to terms with death being all around us by letting us engage with the frightening and alien on our own terms, giving us a sense of control over our loss of control. Additionally, Halloween’s creative side reminds us that death and decay provide opportunities for new growth and life.

The Real & Surreal: How We Experience Earth & Self

The following illustrations tell the story of the odd and isolated. Those of us who enjoy spending time with nothing but ourselves as we admire all parts of nature, such as beautiful landscapes and the clouds in the sky, experience reality differently than those whose days are filled with to-do lists, deadlines, and other people. Finding peace and relief from the frustrations of the real world is necessary every once in a while, and can entail travelling into a zone of enlightenment to the point at which we start to see the surreal. The following illustrations intend to show the power of taking time to experience the earth and one’s self.

Facing It: Dealing With Our Selves

The following sculptures incorporate surrealistic, mythological and magical imagery — often with whimsical overtones — aimed at provoking our experiences and self-reflections. Intending to unbalance our rational minds, the predominant imagery deals mostly with facial expressions of both living and “non-living” beings, and things that speak to us in their own languages. They are textural, metallic and mixed media assemblages that have been assembled, disassembled and reassembled, becoming abstractions unto themselves.